Discover the Captivating History and Spiritual Significance of Ginseng

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By Mia Tran Updated on 02 Aug 2023

In East Asian culture, ginseng has been known as a "miracle cure" since ancient times. Very few people know of its profound spiritual meaning. Ginseng is a powerful tool to draw in love, bring money, cleanse a space, and ward off evil spirits. This article will give you a few ideas for how to use ginseng in spiritual ceremonies, and help you comprehend how it applies to your life spiritually.

5 Spiritual Meanings of Ginseng

5 Spiritual Meanings of Ginseng

1. The Spiritual Meaning of Ginseng

  • Folk names: Sang, wonder of the World 
  • Planet: Sun
  • Element: Fire
  • Spiritual: Love, Manifestation, Cleanse a space, Healing, Lust

Here are some spiritual meanings of Ginseng:

1.1 Health

In Hoodoo, ginseng is believed to possess vitality and strength. Ginseng roots are said to be shaped like a human, with 2 arms and 2 legs, like a walking person. That's why the ginseng plant is linked to health and lust, particularly in men

1.2 Good Luck

According to The Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, ginseng is considered a "Wonder of the World Root" that can bring good luck. Folklore has it that by writing a wish on a ginseng root and placing it under running water,  your wish will come true.

1.3 Love and Lust

In modern magick, ginseng root is carried to attract love, enhance beauty, and promote general good health and vitality. 

1.4 Cleanse a space

Witchfoot said that "when you burn Ginseng root or powder in the form of incense, it can keep the bad stuff away, break hexes, drive away nasty spirits".

2. The meaning of ginseng in Chinese culture

2.1 Traditional Elixir

Chinese Medicine has long championed ginseng as an incredible resource for boosting energy, improving health, and promoting overall well-being. In ancient China, kings wanted to live forever so they sent people to look for an "elixir". Ginseng was the closest they got, people saw ginseng as the answer to immortality. In feudal times, not just anyone could have ginseng. It was saved exclusively for the elite in court. The emperor was the only one with access to top-of-the-line ginseng.

2.2 Symbol of Prosperity 

Ginseng was seen as a sign of wisdom, abundance, and good luck. It was a big part of religious customs and was often given as a special gift.

2.3 Trade and Exploration

Ginseng caused business to flow between Asia and North America, with Native Americans recognizing its medicinal benefits and European settlers chasing after this valuable herb.

2.4 Modern Marvel 

Ginseng remains a cherished herb in contemporary herbal medicine, renowned for its adaptogenic qualities that help restore balance and alleviate stress. 

3. How to Use Ginseng for Spiritual Benefits

  • Carry ginseng root as a talisman to attract love, ensure good health, draw wealth, and manifest sexual virility and beauty
  • Brun ginseng to cleanse a space, ward off evil spirits, and break hexes and curses. 
  • A tea made with ginseng can be used to induce lust, boost energy and soothe the nerves. Put 100ml of water on the stove and let it come to a boil. Throw 2-3 slices of dried ginseng in there and let it sit for 15 minutes before drinking.
  • Use ginseng root in manifest magic by carving your wish into the heart and tossing it into swiftly moving water. 
  • Feng shui expert Wu Quanxi said, "Displaying the image of ginseng roots in the home will help homeowners become more peaceful, happy, and healthy". 
  • Ginseng can also be used as a substitute for rarer and more expensive mandrake.

To attract love fill your pink or red bag with your hair, the heart shape of the sun-dried lemon peel, and the dried ginseng. Don't forget to make it a holy day, and then you'll be able to carry it around the neck with gold chains. 

A top priority at NaturalScents.Net is ensuring that all content is accurate and current through strict sourcing guidelines which rely primarily upon peer-reviewed academic studies. We avoid using tertiary references because our aim is not only to provide you with knowledge but also sources from where it comes so you can verify the accuracy of all claims made within each article. For more details, you can read: our editorial policy.

1. The Spirit is Strong in the Root

https://www.jstor.org/stable/40932162

2. Ginseng: Root of Chinese‐Canadian Relations

https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/CHR-066-01-01

3. The spiritual beings of medicinal herbs in ancient China

https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/ajmedh-2023-0012/html

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